Adam Selzer has a bunch of books out - mostly funny YA novels and smart alecky Chicago history/ghostlore stuff. One time he met Jim Morrison's cousin. New novel PLAY ME BACKWARDS out in August from Simon and Schuster. #satanicya

 

itswalky:

underscorex:

gawdwangit:

romeyooo:

adorkablenerdvana:

sometimes i think that i am not so stereotypical of an american

and then i remember that i consider the coke freestyle machine one of the greatest modern inventions

i mean look at this thing

image

it’s beautiful

over 100 choices, computerized mixing, one spout, touch screen, ice dispenser

image

like wow

have u ever seen anything so wondrous and beautiful??

LIME FANTA IS SO GOOD OMG

Cherry-Vanilla Dr. Pepper.

Orange Coke is the best.

2/3rds grape Fanta, 1/3rd vanilla sprite. Purple vanilla.

Where is this and why isn’t every movie being filmed here? 

Where is this and why isn’t every movie being filmed here? 

downto142:

frettedtoflame:

renrevenge:



I’M FUCKING SCREAMING OMGGGGGG THE TIME HAS COME FOR THE 90S TO ROMANTICIZED BY NON-90S KIDS FUCK

I feel like a legend.

SMH. Late 90s rock music was just awful, most of it. After grunge and alternative got tiresome around 96, we had that brief wave of ska (which asted about a year before every ska band became a swing band, then died out). Beyond that we were leaderless, adrift, and watching helplessly as a generation turned to Limp Bizkit and Kid Rock. You would not have been happier in a world where the people who are into Bieber today would have been into Green Day. It would have just made you hate Green Day. 

downto142:

frettedtoflame:

renrevenge:

I’M FUCKING SCREAMING OMGGGGGG THE TIME HAS COME FOR THE 90S TO ROMANTICIZED BY NON-90S KIDS FUCK

I feel like a legend.

SMH. Late 90s rock music was just awful, most of it. After grunge and alternative got tiresome around 96, we had that brief wave of ska (which asted about a year before every ska band became a swing band, then died out). Beyond that we were leaderless, adrift, and watching helplessly as a generation turned to Limp Bizkit and Kid Rock. You would not have been happier in a world where the people who are into Bieber today would have been into Green Day. It would have just made you hate Green Day. 

(Source: theacheofmodernism)

July 27, 1862

On this day in Chicago history, there was a huge rally to recruit new troops to fight for the Union outside of City Hall. Some 20,000 people attended.

One of the first speeches was made by Isaac Newton Arnold, a buddy of the LIncolns. After praising Chicago for how many soldiers from the city had gone into the field, he roared out the following:

"The suicide of slavery is being enacted before our eyes. Let the cursed, barbarous, traitor-breeding institution die. The slave-holder has himself given to it the mortal wound; let no timid Northern doughface attempt to staunch the blood. The end of slavery will prove the regeneration of the nation…. Let us quarter on the enemy, confiscate the property and free the slaves of rebels."

Immediately after the speech, a chorus sang a brand new song that had just been written in George Root’s office across the street, “The Battle Cry of Freedom.” The Trib transcribed the third verse as;

We will welcome to our numbers the loyal true and brave

shouting the battle cry of freedom

And although he may be poor, he shall never be a slave

shouting the battle cry of freedom

The next speaker, Col. John Farnsworth, talked about all the information on the enemy armies they’d collected from slaves and urged support for bringing negro soldiers into the army (which wouldn’t happen for a few more months in the union; the idea that it ever happened on a large scale in the south is a common myth).  He said he’d speak to white slave owners, and then get a nod from an old man to meet him in a basement, where he’d tell him “massa lied.” 

It goes on like this; speaker after speaker rails against the danger the Union faced at the hands of “the slaveholders,” and spoke of fighting to create “a universal freedom” against rebels fighting for “perpetual slavery.” 

It’s pretty stirring to imagine some of these speeches (even though you’ll basically never find a 19th century speech that isn’t problematic in some way; even when Frederick Douglass spoke in town the next year he cracked an Irish joke or two). 

The most interesting thing about this is to consider the date - July 1862. A good couple of months before the Emancipation Proclamation made freeing slaves a formal goal of the war (at least symbolically). You’re always hearing (from both neo-confederates and the social justice blogosphere) that no one really thought of the war as having anything to do with slavery at the time, but you can’t read the speeches people heard, the letters the wrote, the articles they read, or the songs they sang without getting the impression that everyone knew damn well what it was all about (especially after they figured out that this wasn’t going to be a 90 day dust-up ending with things going back to the way they were). In the 1850s and throughout 1860 southern newspapers and officials weren’t shy in the slightest about saying they wanted to secede to protect (and, critically, spread) slavery.  Actually ending slavery in their lifetimes had always seemed an unrealistic goal even to the most optimistic abolitionists, but people in Summer, 1862 were figuring out that if the war didn’t at least settle the expansion question, we’d just end up fighting the war all over again sooner or later.

Now, this isn’t to say that people in the north who thought their region was “the land of the free” weren’t kidding themselves, or that everyone fighting for the south was fighting for slavery (it’s not like many soldiers owned slaved; they were fighting because there was a war on). People in the north were not markedly less racist.  But when people today run around saying that the war had nothing to do with slavery and no one at the time thought it did, that just drives me nuts.

(above quotes come from 7/28/1862 Chicago Tribune). 

top 10 favorite chick flick comedies (2000s)

The other day we went to the Walker Brothers Pancake House - the original one between Evanston and Wilmette, and presumably the one for which the gift certificate in Mean Girls refers. That place is FANCY. Dark carved wood, forest green wallpaper, and stained glass everywhere. It really is the kind of pancake house one might hit before prom. 

(Source: natallie-dormer)

calumet412:

The west side of the old Chicago Sun Times headquarters (now site of Trump’s building) as it nears completion, 1957, Chicago.

One thing I’ll say for Trump is that his building is a damn site better looking than that old eyesore. 

calumet412:

The west side of the old Chicago Sun Times headquarters (now site of Trump’s building) as it nears completion, 1957, Chicago.

One thing I’ll say for Trump is that his building is a damn site better looking than that old eyesore. 

New H.H. Holmes "Murder Castle" photo found

Found a new photo yesterday while researching another antique serial killer. I’ll be giving a talk on H.H. Holmes on Saturday, July 19th, at the Wilmette, IL Library at 2pm.  

skeletorislove:

Skeletor Affirmations (by ghoulnextdoor)

TODAY I PICK UP THE PIECES AND MOVE ON.

skeletorislove:

Skeletor Affirmations (by ghoulnextdoor)

TODAY I PICK UP THE PIECES AND MOVE ON.

On Saturday (7/5), I’ll be giving a presentation on Lillian Collier at Centuries and Sleuths books, 7419 W Madison St in Forest Park, IL (just outside Chicago, a few doors down from a really good ice cream place) at 2pm.  I have a new Chronicles of Chicago book via Museyon Press this week out that talks about her, and am finishing up a YA mystery novel that features her for Simon and Schuster.  I’ll be talking about her life, and how I finally solved the long-standing mystery of what became of her after 1924.
Lillian is the flapper I mentioned her before who was once sentenced by a judge to read a book of fairy tales to cure her bohemianism; I always thought her story deserved to be far more famous, and I’m doing my part to help!   Here’s an excerpt from a 1924 newspaper article entitled “Is Today’s Girl Becoming a Savage?” in which Lillian was given the chance to defend flappers from Lady Balfour, a British noblewoman who had spoken ill of flappers:
"Lady Balfour had best know the flapper before she condemns her. Maligners say the same things Lady Balfour has said and add some thoughts of their own. Our open and honest ways are too frank for the mid-Victorian critics. Women for too long have played the role of the underdog. That’s why they have been tread upon since the days of the cave man. Relegated to menial work, it was with fear and trembling that they came to their lords and masters. Now woman has broken the traditional bond. She has emerged from restraint that made the old time demure miss, who was a demure miss simply because she dared not to be otherwise.
“The woman of yesterday a deceit box of suppressed desires. Timidity was her watchword, coquetry another name for hoaxing folks. 
“The flapper of today typifies understanding. She is the product of a new age turning toward the light.
“The flapper yearns for good. What then if she does use a bit of powder in the open, smoke a cigarette in the open, and wear the perfume so highly displeasing to Lady Balfour in the open?
“Isn’t that better than doing all these things in the privacy of her boudoir? You can bet it is is. And regardless of what Lady Balfour says, the flapper will survive. She is in process of still further evolution. And since evolution tends ever upward, turn the light on your fears and don’t worry.”

On Saturday (7/5), I’ll be giving a presentation on Lillian Collier at Centuries and Sleuths books, 7419 W Madison St in Forest Park, IL (just outside Chicago, a few doors down from a really good ice cream place) at 2pm.  I have a new Chronicles of Chicago book via Museyon Press this week out that talks about her, and am finishing up a YA mystery novel that features her for Simon and Schuster.  I’ll be talking about her life, and how I finally solved the long-standing mystery of what became of her after 1924.

Lillian is the flapper I mentioned her before who was once sentenced by a judge to read a book of fairy tales to cure her bohemianism; I always thought her story deserved to be far more famous, and I’m doing my part to help!   Here’s an excerpt from a 1924 newspaper article entitled “Is Today’s Girl Becoming a Savage?” in which Lillian was given the chance to defend flappers from Lady Balfour, a British noblewoman who had spoken ill of flappers:

"Lady Balfour had best know the flapper before she condemns her. Maligners say the same things Lady Balfour has said and add some thoughts of their own. Our open and honest ways are too frank for the mid-Victorian critics. Women for too long have played the role of the underdog. That’s why they have been tread upon since the days of the cave man. Relegated to menial work, it was with fear and trembling that they came to their lords and masters. Now woman has broken the traditional bond. She has emerged from restraint that made the old time demure miss, who was a demure miss simply because she dared not to be otherwise.

“The woman of yesterday a deceit box of suppressed desires. Timidity was her watchword, coquetry another name for hoaxing folks. 

“The flapper of today typifies understanding. She is the product of a new age turning toward the light.

“The flapper yearns for good. What then if she does use a bit of powder in the open, smoke a cigarette in the open, and wear the perfume so highly displeasing to Lady Balfour in the open?

“Isn’t that better than doing all these things in the privacy of her boudoir? You can bet it is is. And regardless of what Lady Balfour says, the flapper will survive. She is in process of still further evolution. And since evolution tends ever upward, turn the light on your fears and don’t worry.”

zambiunicorn:

SESAME STREET I SWEAR TO GOD

Just get three of the little ones, guy! Sheesh. 

Also: you look like serial killer Johann Hoch. 

(Source: gameraboy)

psychophancy:

polyamoryspider:

SO PERFECT.

FUCK.

I had an ecomonics prof one time who said pretty much this exact same thing - that safer cars just encouraged us to be unsafe. he used to show us John Stossel videos, and the course materials had a decidedly libertarian slant. 

psychophancy:

polyamoryspider:

SO PERFECT.

FUCK.

I had an ecomonics prof one time who said pretty much this exact same thing - that safer cars just encouraged us to be unsafe. he used to show us John Stossel videos, and the course materials had a decidedly libertarian slant. 

(Source: sassyfeminist)