Adam Selzer has a bunch of books out - mostly funny YA novels and smart alecky Chicago history/ghostlore stuff. One time he met Jim Morrison's cousin. New novel PLAY ME BACKWARDS out in August from Simon and Schuster. #satanicya

 

Only four days til PLAY ME BACKWARDS the #satanicya hits shelves.   
even the most dedicated slacker is devoted to something…
“Hilariously subversive, but also tender and poignant. 9/10.” - VOYA

"Timelessly true to life…diabolically funny…in the tradition of Rob Thomas’ Rats Saw God" - Booklist
"Mordantly funny" - Publisher’s Weekly
"Refusing to rely on burning passion or overwrought sentiment" - Kirkus
A committed slacker enlists the help of his best friend (who may or may not be the devil) to get his act together in this novel filled with humor and honesty, ideal for fans of The Perks of Being a Wallflower.

Leon Harris isn’t exceptional and he isn’t popular. He’s the kind of guy that peaked in middle school, when once upon a time he was in the “gifted” program and on the fast track to Ivy League glory. 

Now, a high school senior, he’s a complete slacker who spends his time hanging out in a third-rate ice cream parlor with his best friend, Stan, a guy who (jokingly, Leon thinks) claims to be Satan. Committed to his sloth, Leon panics when he finds out that Anna, the love of his life aka middle school girlfriend, might be moving back to town. 

Determined to get his act together, Leon asks Stan for help. Stan gives him a few seemingly random and mysterious assignments. Date a popular girl. Listen to “Moby-Dick,” the audiobook. Find the elusive white grape slushee. Join the yearbook committee. 

As each task brings Leon one step away from slacker city and one step closer to Anna, he starts to wonder if maybe he shouldn’t have promised Stan his soul after all…

Also: there’s plenty of sex and swearing in it, and no hidden religious messages, so don’t worry, kids.

Only four days til PLAY ME BACKWARDS the #satanicya hits shelves.   

even the most dedicated slacker is devoted to something…


Hilariously subversive, but also tender and poignant. 9/10.” - VOYA

"Timelessly true to life…diabolically funny…in the tradition of Rob Thomas’ Rats Saw God" - Booklist


"Mordantly funny" - Publisher’s Weekly


"Refusing to rely on burning passion or overwrought sentiment" - Kirkus

A committed slacker enlists the help of his best friend (who may or may not be the devil) to get his act together in this novel filled with humor and honesty, ideal for fans of The Perks of Being a Wallflower.

Leon Harris isn’t exceptional and he isn’t popular. He’s the kind of guy that peaked in middle school, when once upon a time he was in the “gifted” program and on the fast track to Ivy League glory. 

Now, a high school senior, he’s a complete slacker who spends his time hanging out in a third-rate ice cream parlor with his best friend, Stan, a guy who (jokingly, Leon thinks) claims to be Satan. Committed to his sloth, Leon panics when he finds out that Anna, the love of his life aka middle school girlfriend, might be moving back to town. 

Determined to get his act together, Leon asks Stan for help. Stan gives him a few seemingly random and mysterious assignments. Date a popular girl. Listen to “Moby-Dick,” the audiobook. Find the elusive white grape slushee. Join the yearbook committee. 

As each task brings Leon one step away from slacker city and one step closer to Anna, he starts to wonder if maybe he shouldn’t have promised Stan his soul after all…

Also: there’s plenty of sex and swearing in it, and no hidden religious messages, so don’t worry, kids.



Greenock Harbour at Night (detail), John Atkinson Grimshaw, 1893


Always reblog John Atkinson Grimshaw.

Greenock Harbour at Night (detail), John Atkinson Grimshaw, 1893

Always reblog John Atkinson Grimshaw.

victongai:

'Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage' by Haruki Murakami

Victo Ngai

Being a long time Murakami fans, I was super excited when AD Kim from Boston Globe asked me to create the art for the “Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage” book review. 

In “Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage,” Haruki Murakami’s latest novel, he allows his hero to eavesdrop on one of life’s darkest possible tunes: the inner hum, the secret desire, for death. As the book opens, the “colorless” Tsukuru Tasaki has fallen into a terrible depression. Tsukuru’s four closest friends, who are nicknamed by colors, abruptly and unequivocally cut him off. All he can think about is dying. Tsukuru escapes the void, just barely, and emerges a new person, the person we follow through the rest of this book. Murakami elegantly describes how emotional trauma can lead us to disassociate. Read the book review here.

Big thanks to AD Kim Vu. This is actually my first time working with the Boston Globe, what a great way to start!

atomic-flash:

Skunker Skulls, Monster Claws, and Vampire Bats, oh my! - Bats In Your Belfry action toy from Mattel, 1964.

You can tell it’s Mattel - it’s swell!

atomic-flash:

Skunker Skulls, Monster Claws, and Vampire Bats, oh my! - Bats In Your Belfry action toy from Mattel, 1964.

You can tell it’s Mattel - it’s swell!

julieraven:

earthdad:

princedollyjellyfish:

ohsocialjustice:

A very good way of going about explaining this issue. It’s good to see something positive come from Tumblr.

HOLY SHIT. THIS. THIS IS WHAT I HAVE BEEN TRYING TO TELL PEOPLE. SHUT YOUR MOUTH ABOUT MEN VS WOMEN. @_@

this is literally so important

I Need Feminism Because

(Source: homo-club)

forkanna:

callmeoutis:

i was ready to just scroll past like “haha grammar humor” but then it was weird al and i,

OH MY GOD IT IS WEIRD AL THAT’S SO FREAKING AWESOME

(Source: iraffiruse)

itswalky:

underscorex:

gawdwangit:

romeyooo:

adorkablenerdvana:

sometimes i think that i am not so stereotypical of an american

and then i remember that i consider the coke freestyle machine one of the greatest modern inventions

i mean look at this thing

image

it’s beautiful

over 100 choices, computerized mixing, one spout, touch screen, ice dispenser

image

like wow

have u ever seen anything so wondrous and beautiful??

LIME FANTA IS SO GOOD OMG

Cherry-Vanilla Dr. Pepper.

Orange Coke is the best.

2/3rds grape Fanta, 1/3rd vanilla sprite. Purple vanilla.

Where is this and why isn’t every movie being filmed here? 

Where is this and why isn’t every movie being filmed here? 

downto142:

frettedtoflame:

renrevenge:



I’M FUCKING SCREAMING OMGGGGGG THE TIME HAS COME FOR THE 90S TO ROMANTICIZED BY NON-90S KIDS FUCK

I feel like a legend.

SMH. Late 90s rock music was just awful, most of it. After grunge and alternative got tiresome around 96, we had that brief wave of ska (which asted about a year before every ska band became a swing band, then died out). Beyond that we were leaderless, adrift, and watching helplessly as a generation turned to Limp Bizkit and Kid Rock. You would not have been happier in a world where the people who are into Bieber today would have been into Green Day. It would have just made you hate Green Day. 

downto142:

frettedtoflame:

renrevenge:

I’M FUCKING SCREAMING OMGGGGGG THE TIME HAS COME FOR THE 90S TO ROMANTICIZED BY NON-90S KIDS FUCK

I feel like a legend.

SMH. Late 90s rock music was just awful, most of it. After grunge and alternative got tiresome around 96, we had that brief wave of ska (which asted about a year before every ska band became a swing band, then died out). Beyond that we were leaderless, adrift, and watching helplessly as a generation turned to Limp Bizkit and Kid Rock. You would not have been happier in a world where the people who are into Bieber today would have been into Green Day. It would have just made you hate Green Day. 

(Source: theacheofmodernism)

July 27, 1862

On this day in Chicago history, there was a huge rally to recruit new troops to fight for the Union outside of City Hall. Some 20,000 people attended.

One of the first speeches was made by Isaac Newton Arnold, a buddy of the LIncolns. After praising Chicago for how many soldiers from the city had gone into the field, he roared out the following:

"The suicide of slavery is being enacted before our eyes. Let the cursed, barbarous, traitor-breeding institution die. The slave-holder has himself given to it the mortal wound; let no timid Northern doughface attempt to staunch the blood. The end of slavery will prove the regeneration of the nation…. Let us quarter on the enemy, confiscate the property and free the slaves of rebels."

Immediately after the speech, a chorus sang a brand new song that had just been written in George Root’s office across the street, “The Battle Cry of Freedom.” The Trib transcribed the third verse as;

We will welcome to our numbers the loyal true and brave

shouting the battle cry of freedom

And although he may be poor, he shall never be a slave

shouting the battle cry of freedom

The next speaker, Col. John Farnsworth, talked about all the information on the enemy armies they’d collected from slaves and urged support for bringing negro soldiers into the army (which wouldn’t happen for a few more months in the union; the idea that it ever happened on a large scale in the south is a common myth).  He said he’d speak to white slave owners, and then get a nod from an old man to meet him in a basement, where he’d tell him “massa lied.” 

It goes on like this; speaker after speaker rails against the danger the Union faced at the hands of “the slaveholders,” and spoke of fighting to create “a universal freedom” against rebels fighting for “perpetual slavery.” 

It’s pretty stirring to imagine some of these speeches (even though you’ll basically never find a 19th century speech that isn’t problematic in some way; even when Frederick Douglass spoke in town the next year he cracked an Irish joke or two). 

The most interesting thing about this is to consider the date - July 1862. A good couple of months before the Emancipation Proclamation made freeing slaves a formal goal of the war (at least symbolically). You’re always hearing (from both neo-confederates and the social justice blogosphere) that no one really thought of the war as having anything to do with slavery at the time, but you can’t read the speeches people heard, the letters the wrote, the articles they read, or the songs they sang without getting the impression that everyone knew damn well what it was all about (especially after they figured out that this wasn’t going to be a 90 day dust-up ending with things going back to the way they were). In the 1850s and throughout 1860 southern newspapers and officials weren’t shy in the slightest about saying they wanted to secede to protect (and, critically, spread) slavery.  Actually ending slavery in their lifetimes had always seemed an unrealistic goal even to the most optimistic abolitionists, but people in Summer, 1862 were figuring out that if the war didn’t at least settle the expansion question, we’d just end up fighting the war all over again sooner or later.

Now, this isn’t to say that people in the north who thought their region was “the land of the free” weren’t kidding themselves, or that everyone fighting for the south was fighting for slavery (it’s not like many soldiers owned slaved; they were fighting because there was a war on). People in the north were not markedly less racist.  But when people today run around saying that the war had nothing to do with slavery and no one at the time thought it did, that just drives me nuts.

(above quotes come from 7/28/1862 Chicago Tribune). 

top 10 favorite chick flick comedies (2000s)

The other day we went to the Walker Brothers Pancake House - the original one between Evanston and Wilmette, and presumably the one for which the gift certificate in Mean Girls refers. That place is FANCY. Dark carved wood, forest green wallpaper, and stained glass everywhere. It really is the kind of pancake house one might hit before prom. 

(Source: natallie-dormer)